Learn to Take Galaxy Note 8 zoomed-in photos

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Why would you buy the Samsung Galaxy Note 8? If you love the idea of becoming the owner of a device with a 6.3-inch display crammed into a small body, then the Note 8 is ideal, yet the huge screen and its precious tiny stylus — two features that differentiated the Note from Samsung’s more popular Galaxy line – aren’t the only ones in the center of attention.

The camera is also awesome. To be more precise, the Note 8 has two 12-megapixel lenses: one standard wide-angle lens (f/1.7), as well as one telephoto lens (f/2.4) for close-ups, which you can take advantage of in a variety of ways.

The most obvious is being able to zoom in 2x, which is great for bird watching or spying (just kidding), but the point is that you must need to learn how to take Galaxy Note 8 zoomed-in photos.

As you can imagine, your Galaxy Note 8 phablet gives you the chance to digitally zoom in on your subject if you drag the shutter button left or right or pinch the screen with two fingers. However, not many of you know that you can also easily jump right to the telephoto camera by hitting the small “x2” button that can be found at the bottom of the viewfinder window. This will get you somewhat closer to your subject — if you need even more zoom, then you can then drag the shutter button to enter the digital zoom function.

However, I have to want you about an essential aspect – well, it seems that the tele camera on the Note 8 is not nearly as good as the wide angle camera in low light, and depending on where you use it, your device might decide to crop the wide-angle camera instead of switching to the tele to give the same effect. After all, this should come as no surprise as long as this feature doesn’t usually work so great indoors and is best used outside.

And since there is no way of including optical zoom on a phone without it being implausibly thick, the handset uses digital zoom – essentially just cropping the center of the image with a consequent drop in resolution. With two lenses, you overcome this digital zoom in two places, when the camera zoom is set to 1x or even 2x, as long as that’s when each sensor delivers its highest resolution.

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Mike Blass